7 days in Italy-5-19 to 5/25/2022

Day 3- Florence-5/21/2022

Discovering Florence, continuation

We are now going back to the Oltrarno neighborhood which is on the right side of the bridge. 

The Ponte alla Carraia is a five-arched bridge spanning the River Arno and linking the district of Oltrarno to the rest of the city of Florence.

The first mention of the bridge (then built in wood) dates from 1218. Destroyed by a flood in 1274, it was soon reconstructed, but fell down again in 1304 under the weight of a crowd who had met to watch a spectacle.

 

 It was the first bridge in the city rebuilt after the 1333 flood, perhaps under design of Giotto. Again damaged in 1557, it was remade by will of Grand Duke Cosimo I de' Medici, who assigned the project to Bartolomeo Ammannati.  Enlarged during the 19th century, the bridge was blown up by the retreating German Army during World War II (1944). The current structure is a design by Ettore Fagiuoli, completed in 1948.

 

To the west of the bridge is the Pescaia (dam) of Santa Rosa, an artificial barrage on the river Arno.

 

This spillway across the Arno river is Pescaia di Santa Rosa, a weir that was designed to provide power to local mills (now gone), to help tame the river, and as a military defense.

 

 

Gorgeous view from here.

 

I love the last picture with the bird flying above.

 

View of the north bank  across the Arno river.

 

The white buildings are on the north bank street called Lungarno Amerigo Vespucci which, in 1857, was dedicated to an Italian navigator who lived in this neighborhood before exploring the New World in the late 15th century. “America” is derived from his first name.

 

In the center, just below the bell tower is the Church di Ognissanti, a Franciscan church dating back to the mid-13th century.

 

Clover view of the church and its bell tower.

 

 

People sun bathing on the bank of the dam.

 

We are now back in the Oltrarno neighborhood.

 

 Interesting window front with the Vespa in the main window display.

 

A florist shop.

 

People sitting outside for a drink.

 

  Originally, wine windows are small arched opening in private homes where the owners sold the wine from their own vineyards directly to clients.

They are normally carved out on the facade of the home with a stone frame.  A client could knock on the door of the wine window and request to buy a bottle or glass of wine.     

There are 180 wine windows in Florence and 150 of them are in the historic center just like this one.

 

Babae, wine bar has brought back the tradition by opening their wine window to the public.

 From seven to eight each evening, Babae hosts their L’ora della Buchetta,” where they serve glasses of their wine by handing it out to the street. 

 

While most buchette del vino (wine window) have long been sealed up, buying wine through a window was once a regular part of  local life. 

A group of people gathering around the wine window hosted by Babae wine bar.

  

They also ordered some appetizers with their wine.

 

Looks like they are really having fun.

 

We decided to go in a get a drink and some snacks.

 

Hoa is hooked on Negroni while in Europe.

 

Trio of snacks.

 

We did not have any dinner resevation tonight so we asked our server and he recommended Il Santo Bevitore which is only steps away.

 

NEXT.... Day 3-Dinner at il Santo Bevitore

 

 

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